Parenting Pregnancy Travel or Not to travel when Pregnant?

travel_when_pregnantMany women fear to travel when they are pregnant because they feel something would happen or its not safe to travel. They usually avoid traveling which is correct but there is no point avoiding if you have to travel in urgency. Travel can be considered safe if you are going to have a normal and uncomplicated pregnancy. Travel by car should be avoided as its not safe because of bumpy roads and you can’t keep on driving at snail’s pace. Travel by Train is far safer but must be planned properly. So if you are ready to travel which you can’t avoid then you must take certain precautions beforehand.

Tips on Air Travel

If you need to undertake a long air journey when pregnant, it is best to do so in the second trimester. During this time you are feeling healthier and you are too far away from having a premature delivery. In case you need to travel closer toward your due date, avoid flying in any case six weeks prior to your due date. However, this does not mean that it is perfectly safe to do so. If you ever need to fly after your second trimester, it makes sense to speak to your doctor before taking the flight. Also get a letter from your doctor specifying the date your baby is due, as the airlines may not allow you on board. They don’t want you delivering your baby on the plane!

Make it a point to get up and walk around during the flight, to ensure proper circulation. You don’t want blood to pool in your legs leading to blood clots.

Take all other precautions you should be taking when flying like drinking a lot of water, stretching during the flight and so on.

Tips on Road Travel

It is usually safe to travel by train at any time of your pregnancy, but try to avoid travel by car or train until you have completed the first trimester. Get up and stretch every two hours when traveling by train. If you are traveling by car, once again try to travel only in the second trimester. Car journeys are not always smooth, especially if you are traveling over bumpy roads. Always slow down to a snail’s pace when traveling on a bumpy road, and every time you sit in a car, always, always wear your seat belt! Place the seat belt below your abdomen; it should not sit across your tummy.

Other Precautions

  • - Find out whether the place you are traveling to has adequate medical facilities in case of emergencies, and it should be equipped to deal with cesarean sections.
  • - Don’t travel to a place which is located at a very high altitude towards the end of your pregnancy. If you do so, take it easy the first few days and give your body a chance to acclimatize itself.
  • - Eat only well cooked meals and avoid raw foods and salads. You don’t want to fall ill at this stage.
  • - Make sure your vaccinations are up to date before traveling.
  • - It is important to get your health insurance done, especially if you are traveling to a place where medical care is expensive. The plan should include medical costs for the newborn as well.
  • - If you are holidaying during your pregnancy, avoid adventure sports. Scuba diving should be avoided at all costs. Spend your holiday lying back, enjoying the change of scene and pampering yourself.

I would love you to leave me a comment and let me hear your opinion. If you’ve got any thoughts, comments or suggestions for things we could add, leave a comment.

  • Steph

    The advise given about traveling by car is ridiculous. It is very safe to travel by car when pregnant, just take frequent breaks to stretch your legs and WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. I’m not sure if you travel by horseless carriage or what, but my car handles bumps in the roads just fine, smooth as silk. Silly! I experienced more bumping and jostling when I flew at 23 weeks due to air turbulence than I ever do driving my car.

  • Steph

    The advise given about traveling by car is ridiculous. It is very safe to travel by car when pregnant, just take frequent breaks to stretch your legs and WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT. I’m not sure if you travel by horseless carriage or what, but my car handles bumps in the roads just fine, smooth as silk. Silly! I experienced more bumping and jostling when I flew at 23 weeks due to air turbulence than I ever do driving my car.

  • courtney

    this article says you should avoid eating salads. i had read somewhere before now that salads containing spinach and leaves such as spinach are ok?

  • Bianca

    Pregnant woman should eat as much raw fruit and veg as possible – to tell them not to is a sin! They will get much more nutrition and many studies have shown that women who consume a raw or mostly raw diet in the months before pregnancy have a much easier time during labour! So old school to cook your food until it is dead and there is no nutrition left!

  • Felicia Roberts

    It entirely depends upon you what you want to eat. When you are close to your labor days, you shouldn’t fall ill right?

    Various studies have shown that raw food sometimes especially during last leg of pregnancy increase your chances of falling ill. A well cooked meal would be a better choice.

    BTW: Raw diet will help in labor, i don’t think so.

  • Annie

    My experience with traveling by car during pregnancy was horrible. I had to go to the countryside with my in laws and the roads where pathetic. Although, we tried to avoid as many holes and jerks as we can still the entire experience was pathetic.

    I will never advise anyone to travel long distances by car specially in last few months of pregnancy.

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